Avaya’s IPOffice platform provides a monitor application to troubleshoot all sorts of issues with calls and phones.

A nice reference for IP Office’s Monitor application is hosted at this link.

http://www.oc-stuff.com/mergedProjects/monitor/

Another handy reference when troubleshooting dropped calls are the ISDN cause codes.

http://www.oc-stuff.com/mergedProjects/monitor/htm_cause_codes_(isdn).htm

[SysMon Manual]

 

In case you need to physically locate and access point that is controlled by a WLC you can do so by making the LED status light blink on demand.

You will first need to enable debug mode on the AP to enable the controller to send commands to it from its CLI

debug ap enable your_access_point_name

NOTE:The output of these commands is sent only to the controller console, regardless of whether the commands were entered on the console or in a TELNET/SSH CLI session.

To make a specific access point to flash its LEDs for a specified number of seconds, enter this command:

debug ap command "led flash seconds" your_access_point_name

You can enter a value between 1 and 3600 seconds for the seconds parameter.

To disable LED flashing for a specific access point, enter this command:

debug ap command "led flash disable" your_access_point_name

You can disable debug mode once you’ve located you AP by using this command or simply close your ssh session

debug ap disable your_access_point_name

[source:CISCO WLC Config Guide]

 

Following up on my previous post on how to find out who has send-as rights on a mailbox, here’s how you can do the same for a distribution group.

Get-ADPermission -identity distributiongroupname | where {($_.ExtendedRights -like “*Send-As*”) -and ($_.IsInherited -eq $false) -and -not ($_.User -like “NT AUTHORITY\SELF”)} | FT -Wrap

It’s essentially the same command. Instead of piping the mailbox object to the Get-ADPermission cmdlet, here you’re telling the Get-ADPermission cmdlet the name of the distribution group you want to find who has permissions for.

 

Here’s a quick way to find out who has send-as permissions on a particular mailbox

Get-Mailbox -identity mailboxname | Get-ADPermission | where {($_.ExtendedRights -like “*Send-As*”) -and ($_.IsInherited -eq $false) -and -not ($_.User -like “NT AUTHORITY\SELF”)} | FT -Wrap

You can also pipe in all mailboxes or a server or database to find out send-as permissions on all mailboxes as follows

Get-Mailbox | Get-ADPermission | where {($_.ExtendedRights -like “*Send-As*”) -and ($_.IsInherited -eq $false) -and -not ($_.User -like “NT AUTHORITY\SELF”)} | FT -Wrap

Get-Mailbox -Server servername | Get-ADPermission | where {($_.ExtendedRights -like “*Send-As*”) -and ($_.IsInherited -eq $false) -and -not ($_.User -like “NT AUTHORITY\SELF”)} | FT -Wrap

 

You can log off a Cisco ASA VPN session from the command line as follows

Find the users session index

show vpn-sessiondb | include (username)

The index field is what you’re looking for. Once you have this you can log that particular session off by using the following command.

vpn-sessiondb logoff index XXXX

where XXXX is the index number.

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