By default CentOS allows ssh access to all users who can authenticate with the server. This can be a security risk especially when you have setup the server to authenticate against an Active Directory domain. In this case all the users on the domain can login via ssh to your CentOS server. You can, however, very easily restrict logins to specific users, computers, or even users on specific computers.

To do this, edit /etc/ssh/sshd_config by adding the AllowUsers directive in the following format.

AllowUsers user@host

This allows the user ‘user’ to login at the host named ‘host’. Multiple users can listed by separating each with a space. You can also use * to specify wildcards. You can also specify IP addresses and ranges using *.

AllowUsers *@192.168.1.* johndoe@192.168.1.3

This will allow all users to log into all computers with address starting with 192.168.1 and the user johndoe to log only into the with IP address 192.168.1.3.

This will work for other Linux OSes as well.

 

The only working way I’ve found is to first insert and image into a google document and then copy/pasting it into gmail in Rich Text mode. It’s as simple as that.

 

To change the timezone from the command line in Windows, type the following at the prompt and press enter. This will open up the timezone setting window from the Control Panel.

RunDLL32 shell32.dll,Control_RunDLL %SystemRoot%\system32\TIMEDATE.cpl,,/Z US Eastern Standard Timep

In a limited access account, (all members of the USER group) you can run this command using Runas.

runas /u:%computername%\administrator cmd

followed by

RunDLL32 shell32.dll,Control_RunDLL %SystemRoot%\system32\TIMEDATE.cpl,,/Z US Eastern Standard Timep

This method works in both XP and Vista.

UPDATE: Or you can also simply type ‘timedate.cpl’ on the command line as an admin to bring up the control panel applet.

[src]

 

The lsof command can display all open files in Linux. With some filtering you can use it to show all open/utilized ports as well.

lsof -i TCP:443
This command will list all processes, their pids, and user under which the process is running, that are utilizing port 443.

To list all TCP ports, one could use
lsof -i TCP

Type lsof –help for more options.

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